Resources » Zillah High School Course Descriptions 2022-2023

Zillah High School Course Descriptions 2022-2023

 

AGR 100-Introduction to Agriculture: (9-12) A semester survey course of agriculture industry topics exposing students to the many and varied types of agriculture/agriculture related career opportunities.  The specific topics may include: agriculture careers, animal science, plant & horticulture science, vegetable, fruits/grapes & tree fruits, agronomy: irrigation, soils & field crops, agriculture chemistry and pest management, agriculture engineering and agriculture leadership development. Crediting allowed for Career-Technical Education (CTE) requirement or General Elective toward graduation. (CIP 010000, WC 18001)

 

AGR 110-Animal Systems: (9-12) A one semester course in agriculture focusing on livestock production and management.  Course topics include: the animal kingdom, agriculture animals (beef, swine, sheep, dairy, equine, goat, and poultry, growth, management, selection, reproduction, nutrition, digestive systems, disease control and the marketing of livestock.  Credit offered for Career-Technical Education (CTE), or general elective.  (CIP 010901, WC 18101)

 

AGR 120-Plant Systems: (9-12) A one semester course in agriculture focusing on plant and crop production and management.  Course topics include: the plant kingdom, plant physiology, plant parts and their functions, nutrition, disease, environmental factors affecting plant growth, crop production (field crops, specialty crops, hay/forage crops, tree fruits, small fruits, grapes), soils, irrigation, pest controls and strategies of marketing plants for food, fiber and recreational use. Credit offered for Career-Technical Education (CTE), or general elective. (CIP 011101, WC 18051)

 

AGR 130-Natural Resources: (9-12) A one semester course introduces the student to the management techniques used to maintain resources and the responsibility each of us have in preserving the earth.  With A “hands on” approach students will study eco systems and components of soil, water, forest, fish and wildlife systems, environmental management, conservation, ecology, habitats, pollution/invasive species, energy and renewable resources. With each topic career options will be explored. Crediting allowed for, Career-Technical Education (CTE) or general elective toward graduation. (CIP 030101, WC 18504)

 

AGR 140-Greenhouse Operations: (9-12, Recommend completion of Introduction to Agriculture) A semester course open to all students who desire to learn more about the horticulture industry or pursuing a horticulture career. Topics include greenhouse management & operations, applied plant science parts & functions, plant propagation, greenhouse structures & functions, plant growth, care, & development, soils and media, plant nutrition, plant pests & disease identification/control, and record keeping.  Crediting allowed for Career-Technical Education (CTE) requirement, or general elective toward graduation. Maybe repeated with instructor permission. (CIP 010604, WC18052)

 

AGR 150-Agriculture Mechanics: (9-12, May be repeated with instructor permission.) A semester course introduces students to skills, tools and equipment used in the agriculture industry.  Students apply basic industrial knowledge and develop skills in areas which may include safety, career opportunities, care of tools, machines and equipment, repairs, engine mechanics, power systems, welding, electric power principles and other related topics. Crediting allowed for Career-Technical Education (CTE) requirement, or general elective toward graduation. (CIP 010205, WC 18404)

 

BUS 110-Digital Communications Tools: (Grades 9-12) A one semester exploratory course designed to introduce students to keyboarding and Microsoft Office Suite through the Cengage SAM online skill building curriculum. Students will learn basic keyboarding skills and work to increase speed and accuracy throughout the course. Students will be introduced to Microsoft Word, Excel, Outlook and PowerPoint with an emphasis on how these platforms are used in the business world. These tools will continue to be used throughout the high school exploratory and preparatory sequence in our Business Program. Students will also explore career paths that interest them and learn job seeking skills such as resume writing and interviewing. (CIP 110601, WC 12006)

 

BUS 120- Digital Design: (Grades 10-12 - Prerequisite Digital Communication Tools and Microsoft Academy) This one semester class develop skills that lay the foundations for producing graphic design elements for web and print. Students will gain graphic design principles, planning and development, peer review and redesign. The software used is current with the industry standards. Students will be the Adobe Suite - Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign. Students will develop a variety of graphic images and an electronic portfolio. (CIP 110801, WC 10201)

 

BUS 130-Microsoft Academy: (Grades 9-12 - Prerequisite Digital Communication Skills with a C or better or instructor permission.) In Computer Applications courses, students acquire knowledge of and experience in the proper and efficient use of Application Software. This course utilizes Microsoft 2016 and explores a wide range of applications, including Word, Excel and PowerPoint. As students master the software, they will be allowed to take the Microsoft Office User Specialist test online from Microsoft and become MOUS Certified. Students will be allowed to take this course multiple times for multiple credits as long as they are moving forward through MOUS Certifications. Taking this course multiple times requires successful completion of MOUS Certifications and instructor approval. This is a self-paced class after the first unit as students learn and test at different rates. Students must be intrinsically motivated to complete the work and continue moving forward in order to satisfactorily complete this course. (CIP 110601, WC 10005)

 

BUS 140-Accounting: (Grades 10-12) A one semester course designed to be an introduction to financial accounting. The primary goal of this class is to learn the basic equations, rules and procedures for accounting in a small, proprietorship business. Both manual and computer accounting concepts will be studied through work in the textbook, Excel and the Knowledge Matters Virtual Business Accounting Simulation. (CIP 520301, WC 121104)

 

BUS 150-Introduction to Computer Science A: (Grades 9-12) Today, 58% of all new STEM-related jobs are in computing, but just 10% of STEM graduates are in computer science. To help alleviate this shortage, students in this class will take a second step to becoming proficient in computer programming by learning to write in code utilizing the PYTHON language. This curriculum and the support staff offers all students from all demographics and backgrounds the opportunity to become competent in computational thinking, problem solving, programming and other computer science concepts that are applicable to any field. We use the online Carnegie Mellon University Computer Science Academy curriculum units 1-6. This class is taught via Zoom with Computer Science professionals working at Microsoft, Reddit and Amazon in Seattle as well as in the classroom with Ms Funfar. (CIP 110201, WC 10151)

 

BUS 155-Introduction to Computer Science B: (Grades -12 with a prerequisite of Intro to Computer Science A with a passing grade) Continuing with the CMU CS Academy curriculum units 7-12 students will dive deeper into the Python language and its capabilities for programming games and apps. The final class project is to create a unique video game or app using the skills learned from both classes. This class is taught via Zoom with Computer Science professionals working at Microsoft, Reddit and Amazon in Seattle as well as in the classroom with Ms Funfar. (CIP 110201, WC 10151)

 

BUS 160-Business Law: (Grades 10-12) A one semester course designed to help students become aware of the principles of law and how to apply them to various legal situations. Students will study contracts, liability, ownership structures, risk management, bankruptcy, employment law, torts, civil procedures, criminal law and legal ethics. Students will understand the difference between torts and crimes, and how the court systems work. Students will be challenged to think analytically and use problem solving skills. (CIP 22001, WC 12054)

 

BUS 170-Business Management: (Grades 10-12) This one semester course is designed to help students gain skills needed to manage or start a small business. Students will utilize reason, estimation. logic, and creative thinking to solve business problems. Students will be able to identify and explain the steps involved in planning and organizing a business and tasks necessary to the operation of a business. Ethical and social responsibilities of business and the qualities and characteristics of the successful entrepreneur/manager will be explored. This class is project based and uses the Knowledge Matters Virtual Business Management Simulation. (CIP 520701, WC 12053

 

BUS 180- Hospitality Management: (Grades 10-12) In one semester students will learn the basic skills needed to manage or open a restaurant or work in the hotel industry. Students will utilize reason, logic, and creative thinking to solve business problems using the Knowledge Matters Virtual Business Restaurant and Hotel Simulations. Students will be able to identify steps in managing employees, inventory, cost controls, menu planning, environment and marketing needed to run a Hospitality business. Ethical and social responsibilities of business management will also be discussed. (CIP 520905)

 

BUS 190- Retail Marketing Management: (Grades 10-12) In this one semester class, students will learn basic skills needed to manage and market a retail operation. Students will utilize reason, logic and creative thinking to solve business problems using the Knowledge Matters Virtual Business Retailing Simulation. Students will be able to identify steps in managing employees, inventory, cost controls, ordering, space utilization, marketing, and advertising. Ethical and social responsibilities of business management will also be discussed. (CIP 521401)

 

YVT 500, 502, 503-Yakima Valley Technical Skills Center: (11-12; Prerequisite: application and visitation to facilities required before enrollment) Students may elect to enroll free of cost at YV Tech to develop employment skills and experiences. Participation at YV Tech should align with the students High School and Beyond Plan. YVT Mission: To prepare all students with the skills, knowledge, and attitude to successfully advance to the next educational or career level. Visit the YVT Website for further information. www.yvtech.us. (WC 22999)

 

 

 

 

Electives may be chosen from courses in the Career-Technical Education, English, Fine Arts, Foreign Language, Health & Fitness, Science and Social Studies Departments.   In addition, the following are options for elective offerings at ZHS.

 

SPE 100-Introduction to Public Speaking: (9-12) A semester course that examines the foundations of communication and public speaking. Students will learn basic principles of effective public speaking, audience analysis, message preparation, and critical listening skills.  Students develop skills that will enable them to compose and deliver speeches in accordance with specific rhetorical concepts. Students will work to improve their ability to analyze, organize, and critically think about messages while becoming better equipped to articulate our own ideas. It is expected that students will prepare and research their speeches using and citing a variety of sources (including, but not limited to, newspapers, magazines, journals, books, webpages, etc.). This course would be an excellent preparation for the Senior Portfolio Project. panel presentation.  May not be repeated.  Credit applies as an elective for graduation.  (WC 01151)

 

YBK 100-Yearbook: (11-12 Prerequisite: Permission of Advisor) An independent study course which will produce the current ZHS yearbook, the "OWEGO". Students are selected based on creativity, dependability, organization, commitment, recommendation by faculty and interest shown by student. Producing the OWEGO includes photography, writing, page design and editing, as well as budgeting, and book sales. May be repeated with permission.  Students should contact the yearbook advisor when add/drop is open. (WC 11104)

 

AIDE POSITIONS: These positions are limited to 1 period per day and are graded as Pass/Fail only. All aide positions will require: an interview with the supervisor (teacher, secretary, and/or principal), a completed application form. May be repeated with permission. Students should contact a teacher when add/drop is open. Not recommended for university bound students.

SER 120-Office Aide:  11-12) Aides are needed at ZHS each period of the day and at times also at other ZSD building’s offices. Office aides will be selected based on the student’s reliability, attendance record, previous academic and citizenship record, grades, and appropriate office skills. (WC 22051)

SER 140-Teacher Aide: (11-12) This position is open to students who wish to help our teaching staff (K-12) prepare for instruction.  It is the student’s responsibility to contact the teacher at add/drop time to arrange for this placement and complete the proper paperwork. (WC 22995)

 

 

ENG 110-111-English/LA  9: (9) A two semester freshman level English course.  The major focus of this course is on composition the first semester and literature study the second semester.   Proofreading, oral presentation skills, creative writing, expository essay writing and reading are the major focus for both terms. The course requires maintenance of a writing portfolio.

ENG 110-9A Composition:   This semester focuses on the development of the writing process as it applies to the descriptive, narrative, and expository modes of writing.  Emphasis is on pre-writing, organization, revision (including peer groups), and publishing (including editing). (WC 01001)

ENG 111-9B Literature:   This semester covers poetry, mythology/epic poetry, dramatic literature, non-fiction, and novels. Focus is on literary terms, comprehension, and themes.  Also included are analytical essays, and creative writing projects. (WC 01051)

 

ENG 120-121-English/LA 10: (10) A two semester sophomore level English course.

ENG 120-10-A Composition: The major focus of this semester is on literature and composition covering the writing process, in-depth expository essays, the formal research paper, non-fiction, poetry, and drama units. (WC 01001)

ENG 121-10-B Literature:  The focus for this semester is literature and writing about literature through a sequence of thematically unified short story, novel, and film units. (WC 01051)

ENGLISH FOR GRADES 11 & 12 Four semesters of English are required for students in the last two years of their study at ZHS.  

  • Regular Track English Students take a one semester required English Composition 11 and a Junior/Senior Literature elective course in their junior year, and English 12 Composition and another Junior/Senior Literature elective course in their Senior year.

 

ENG 190:  English 11 Composition: (11) A one semester composition course required for juniors not already enrolled in Honors English courses. Junior Composition has students work through a series of units designed to prepare them for writing tasks they will encounter after high school.   The writing tasks will take the student through several basic modes of writing, including expository and research writing.  This course emphasizes student use of the writing process, the use of models, editing practice, peer evaluation and publishing.   It also provides a strong foundation in research skills and citation. (WC 01102)

 

ENG 191: English 12 Composition (12) A one semester composition class required for seniors not already enrolled in Honors English courses. Senior Composition is a writing class that focuses on logic and research to develop assignments. Students will work through a series of essays that build on the skills practiced in Junior Composition to present skillfully executed, mature, analytical and argumentative topics.  Students will cover document design, analysis of various media, rhetorical analysis of multiple sources, synthesis, evaluation and proposal writing as they grow in their understanding of the possibilities of argumentation.  Students will also complete the senior project presentation essay as part of this course. This course will appear in the schedule ONLY in Fall and Winter to facilitate Senior Portfolio Project completion and prepare students for post-secondary communication requirements. (WC 01102)

 

ENGLISH COURSES OFFERED FOR JUNIOR/SENIOR ENGLISH ELECTIVE CREDIT.  If not taking Honors English courses, you need two courses from this list between the junior and senior years. 

 

OFFERED IN ODD GRADUATION YEARS (2023)

 

ENG 140-Junior/Senior Creative Writing: (11-12) A semester course that focuses on the study of a variety of writing modes, using multiple literary examples as models to produce student writing.  Students will explore the styles and methods of writing poetry, the short story, song lyrics and children’s literature.  Students will develop and publish their own five-page novella as a final for the course. (WC 01104)

 

ENG 170-Junior/Senior Science Fiction Literature: Science Fiction Literature (11-12) A semester course that focuses on the major themes and issues of the science fiction genre.  The students will study the elements of literature through a sequence of short stories, novels and films. Elements of composition will be incorporated within the course. (WC 01061)

 

ENG 175-Junior/Senior Dramatic Literature: (11-12) A one semester course which explores dramatic literature.  Will include plays from throughout history in a study of their forms, techniques, and literary merit.  This is not an acting class, though reading aloud in class will be a part of it.  In addition to reading this genre of literature, students will be doing research projects, writing expository essays, and doing short oral projects. (WC 01061)

 

ENG 180-Junior/Senior World Literature: (11-12) A semester course that focuses on literature and composition study.  It covers a variety of literature from around the world and reveals how various literary themes transcend borders.   The course is intended to give a global perspective to students through novels, poetry, short stories and film.   In this class, students will hone their composition skills, research skills, comprehension skills, and oral presentation skills. (WC 01058)

 

OFFERED IN EVEN GRADUATION YEARS (2024)

 

ENG 130-Junior/Senior American Literature: (11-12) A semester course that covers selections from American literature unified thematically around the search for the American dream and our continuing search for success.  It includes reading several short novels, plays, and poems. There will be a continued focus on the refinement of the expository essay, research writing and oral presentation.  (WC 01054)

 

ENG 135-Junior/Senior Literature: Contemporary Literature: (11-12) A semester course that explores a variety of modern novels, short stories and plays that appeal to young adult readers.  Students will study the elements of literature, hone their composition skills and explore themes that run throughout these stories of many cultures and experiences from recent times. (WC 01062)

 

ENG 160-Junior/Senior Literature: Poetry: (11-12) A semester course which explores the genre of poetry.  It includes two divisions.  In the writing division, students study a multitude of poem forms and styles, and publish a portfolio of their work by the conclusion of the class.  In the literature division, the course surveys the history and various styles of poetry with an emphasis on discovering the sound and the sense of each piece and using them as models for student writing.  Students will also write expository essays, conduct some research and do oral readings and presentations. (WC 01061)

 

ENG 171: Junior/Senior Literature: Fantasy: (11-12) A semester course designed to introduce the student to a cross-section of works and writers from the Fantasy Genre and is a companion course for Science Fiction Literature.  Students will read selections from major Fantasy authors, studying character, symbol and theme in a variety of forms ranging from poetry to short story and novels. Elements of composition will be incorporated within the course.  (WC 01061)

 

HONORS ENGLISH COURSES (Grades 11-12)

 

Students may elect to take English Honors courses to get an accelerated and more in-depth study of subject matter.  Greater expectations and requirements are placed on students in the Honors English courses. 

Placement into Honors English courses is made based on Smarter Balanced ELA Scores of 3 or 4, Accuplacer Test Scores, teacher recommendations, prior English grades and examples of previous student work. 

Honors English courses carry potential college credit:

  • 5 Central Washington University credits upon completion of both English 300 and 301
  • 5 Central Washington University credits upon completion of English 302
  • 5 Central Washington University credits upon completion of English 305. 

Students wishing to earn the credit through CWU pay for the tuition but at a greatly reduced rate.  Contact an English instructor if you are interested in learning more about honors English courses.

 

ENG 300 & 301-Honors English 11: (11). Students may elect to take English Honors courses to get an accelerated and more in-depth study of subject matter. 

ENG 300: Students cover essays and assignments from the Allyn Bacon Guide to Writing, culminating in a multi-source exploratory essay. (WC 01102)

ENG 301: (Prerequisite: Completion of ENG 300 with a B or higher) Students will cover various literature units in non-fiction essays, drama, short stories and novels, culminating in an in-depth literary research project treating the writings of a single author.  The literature focus will be on American authors. (WC 01058)

               

ENG 302, 305-Honors English 12: (12; Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG 301 with a B or higher and demonstrated performance of outstanding English skills) This course will also help facilitate completion of relevant writing requirements for Senior Portfolio Project.

ENG 302: Students will cover a series of essay assignments from the Allyn and Bacon Guide to Writing related to synthesis, evaluation, surprising thesis, culminating with an extended proposal research project. (WC 01102)

              ENG 305: (Prerequisite: Completion of ENG 302 with a B or higher): Students will cover various literature units in non-fiction essays, drama, short stories and novels, culminating in an in-depth research paper on a banned or challenged novel. (WC 01054)

 

 

ART 100-Beginning Art: (9-12) A semester course designed to help students develop knowledge in color the formal elements and principles of Art. Watercolor, pastels, collage, and tempera paint are among the media explored.  Participation is graded during periodic critiques of student work.  This class emphasizes craftsmanship! Success in this class does not rely on talent but rather effort and craftsmanship skills. (WC 05155)

 

ART 120-Advanced Art: (10-12, Prerequisite: Completion of Beginning Art with a grade of “B” or higher or instructor permission.  Note: Student lab fee required for materials).  This semester course is designed to further develop the skills gained in Beginning Art.   A greater variety of media are explored, and assignments give more freedom to student when choosing subject matter and content of artwork.  Students are required to participate in critiques of student work. May be repeated with permission of the instructor.  Students repeating the course will develop an art project contract. (WC 05157)

 

ART 130- Basic Drawing: (9-12) A semester course which is an introduction to visual expression through the exploration of various black and white media.   Still life, landscape, portrait, the human figure, and other subjects will be drawn. Formal concepts such as line, texture, value and perspective will be explored through representational and abstract means. (WC 05155)

 

ART 140- Visual Journaling: (9-12, may be repeated up to 4x with instructor permission) A semester course which provides a foundation in drawing and painting using a variety of media and techniques, emphasizing observation and interpretation of the visual environment. Students will apply the elements of art and principles of design, along with a study of art and artists from a worldwide perspective, and instruction in the critique process. Can be taken up to four times. (WC 05155)

 

ART 150- Off the Page: (9-12) A semester course. Course Objective: To focus on fine artwork of the three-dimensional sort. Artworks will be completed in a variety of different media. Grading will be based primarily on craftsmanship, effort and creative thought. Projects to include the following: Cardboard wildlife sculpture, Garbage Sculpture to make ecological statement, scullery sculpture magnets, mobiles, Plexiglas illuminated sculpture, Newspaper tube sculpture, wire figures, Popsicle stick architecture, fabric sculpture, paper mache, human sculpture, bean and rice mosaic, basketry, plaster figures, cardboard furniture. In addition, there are opportunities for tow dimensional exploration such as drawing and painting, a film project, and an installation piece. Campus beautification projects may be included. Some of the need supplies will be acquired by the student.

 

 

DRM 100- Drama 1-Introduction to Drama: (9-12) This course assumes no prior acting experience, but it does assume that you want to have fun!  The course begins with group activities that teach working together and taking risks in a safe environment.  To hone your skills on stage, we go through units on basic pantomime, oral reading and voice production, characterization, and then prepare a short solo performance scene, or monologue, for the final project.  Throughout, you will play lots of games and complete projects that will help you overcome stage fright and have a working knowledge of the stage and its craft. (WC 05053)

 

DRM 110-Drama 2-Advanced Acting and Directing: (10-12, Offered Odd Graduation 2024; Prerequisite: Passed Introductory Drama or instructor permission) This one semester Drama 2 level course continues where the introductory class left off.  We will keep working on your movement and vocal skills by playing improvisational games.  In addition, more in depth group activities will help you learn about working in an ensemble to create scenes, including development of directing, rehearsing and performance skills.  You will also get an overview of the technical and organizational side of the theater business.  An exploration of the rich history of the theater will also be a part of the focus of this class, allowing lots of chances to try your hand at acting styles of different times and places.  It is similar to Drama 1, but this class goes into more in depth. May be repeated with teacher permission. (WC 05053)

 

DRM 111-  Theatre Tech and Administration: (10-12, Offered even Graduation Years 2023; Prerequisite: Passed Introductory Drama or instructor permission.) An introductory course on the basic technical theatre skills used in pre, post, and running phases of theatrical productions.  The class will focus both on design and construction in several areas. Units include set design, set construction and painting, lighting design, hang and focus, costume design and construction, stage makeup, sound design, and theatre administration.  Units are project based, with emphasis on safety, teamwork, design, dependability, and understanding the many different areas that go into theatre productions.  (WC 05053)

 

DRM 170-Introduction to American Film: (9-12) This semester course attempts to cultivate an appreciation for film as an art form and as a communication medium. Without knowing it, we all understand the language of film. We use our knowledge, unconsciously, every time we sit in a theater or watch a movie on television. In this course, we take a critical step forward to study the language of film, as well as the nature of this art form.  Students examine various themes, topics and issues presented in films and are introduced to principles and techniques of cinematic art, expressed primarily through the history of the American cinema. Through selected screenings, film clips, readings, lectures, and discussion groups, students develop a cinema literacy that enhances their appreciation of works that have enthralled millions over the years. The student will use their analytical writing skills to evaluate and critique films.  The students will be exposed to basic elements used in film to tell the story such as the camera perspective, scenes, editing, sound, lighting, elements of meaning, and the narrative technique.  The course will elevate the student's appreciation for motion pictures and further enhance the student's expressive, communicative, and critical thinking skills. (WC 05099)

 

MUS 100-102: Concert Band: (9-12 Prerequisite: Student is required to have a basic knowledge of music and their own instrument.) Concert band is offered each semester and is designed to allow an instrumentalist to experience and perform various musical styles and expressions.  Throughout this course, teamwork will accompany individual accountability.  Required scheduled performances may include concerts, festivals, parades, and school sporting events.  Students are evaluated through their level of daily participation and preparation, playing and written tests, performances, and classroom attendance. May be repeated with permission of instructor. MUS-100-Fall, MUS-101-Winter, MUS-102-Spring (WC 05102)

 

MUS 120-122-Chorus: (9-12) An introductory course in choral music.  No experience is necessary, but students should have a sincere desire to sing and to improve on their vocal music skills. Required scheduled performances may include concerts, competitions or festivals.  Students are evaluated through their level of daily participation and preparation, performances, written tests, and classroom attendance. May be repeated with permission of instructor. (WC 05110) MUS-120-Fall, MUS-121-Winter, MUS-122-Spring

 

MUS 130- World Music (9-12) This course explores the ways that music is both shaped by and gives shape to the cultural settings in which it is performed, through studying selected musical traditions from around the world. Specific case studies will be examined closely through listening, analysis, and hands-on instruction. (WC 05149)

 

MUS 140-Music Theater Singing: (9-12) Students will learn the basics of solo, small group, and large group singing through the musical theater experience.  Students will cover performance concepts such as performing with gestures, small blocking, and vocal basics.  May be repeated with permission of instructor. (WC 05111)

 

MUS 150-Music Appreciation: (9-12) A semester course designed for the student interested in expanding an understanding of music but is not interested in a performance class. Fundamental musical concepts (melody, harmony, rhythm, form, etc.) through illustrations of the instrumental and vocal music of major composers from the earliest period through the present day. Subject areas will cover the music of the classical composers from 13th century to present.  An understanding of music style, form and structure are used by the students to identify the time period and likely composer for the works played in class. Students are evaluated through their level of daily participation and preparation, their ability to identify specific classical works, their ability to place other pieces within their proper timeframe and their ability to understand the connection between music and historical events, art, architecture and philosophy, and classroom attendance. (WC 05118)

 

MUS 160-Rock & Roll History: (9-12) A semester course designed for the student interested in the history of Rock & Roll music, but not interested in a performance class.  America’s second indigenous musical art form, after jazz, 1950’s to present. Emphasis on artists and cultural/societal forces shaping music’s evolution Major artists of each decade will be featured.  Students will also study how music was used as a voice in social history.  (WC 05116)

 

MUS 180-Independent Music Study: (9-12; Prerequisite: permission of teacher and Principal, .5 credit available.) This course is designed for the serious music student to study an aspect of music outside the regular ZHS schedule. (WC 05109)

 

MUS 200-202-Jazz Band: (Not a pre-registration choice. 9-12, AUDITION ONLY; Prerequisite: An above average knowledge of music and of their major instrument, audition and permission of the instructor) A specialized music course for the instrumentalist.  Required scheduled performances may include concerts, festivals, and school sporting events.  Special ensemble presentations may be arranged.   Students are evaluated through their level of daily participation and preparation, playing and written tests, performances, and classroom attendance.  May be repeated with permission of instructor. (WC 05105)

 

 

 

HPE 100-Health Education: (9-12) A semester course required for all ZHS students covering aspects of healthy living, improvement of health during teen years and setting patterns for a healthy adult life. Topics include the following concepts: nutrition, family and social health, life cycles, personal health and fitness, medicines, drugs, alcohol, and tobacco, communicable and non-communicable diseases and disorders, mental health, community and environmental health, consumer issues, and safety. Students will participate in various individual, partner, and group research activities relating to these health topics.  May not be repeated. (WC 08051)

 

HPE 120-Sports Medicine & First Aid: (9 -12) A one-semester course designed to teach the basics of first aid, CPR, human anatomy, identification of injuries, treatment and prevention of injuries, and rehabilitation of injuries.  Aspects of healthy living for athletes are also reviewed.  This course is recommended for any student interested in medicine, physical therapy, athletic training or who might be interested in coaching in the future.  Students who successfully complete this class may be recruited to be assistant athletic trainers for the various sports teams. (WC 08017)

 

HPE 131-133-Weight Training: (9-12 Students with chronic joint, bone, or other medical problems are advised to seek clearance prior to registration for weight training.  Students wishing to repeat this course should have earned at least a “C” in the last semester of participation.) A course offered Fall, Winter & Spring semesters designed to allow students to gain confidence, self-esteem, an awareness of their own bodies and an awareness of the body's capabilities through weight training.  Students develop an understanding of weight training principles and their application towards each student's own life.  Training on all the major weightlifting techniques is given. Students will learn which weight training methods can be used to develop the strengths they want for their own body. Weight training for specific sports is taught along with instruction regarding general health and fitness. Plyometric exercises are also used to develop leg strength and quickness. Aspects of healthy living are included. Philosophy of Weight Training program: “To create a greater understanding of one's body and the power it contains.”   It is highly recommended that athletes register for weight training before and during their season. Please consult your coach for recommended scheduling. HPE 131-Fall, 132-Winter, 133-Spring. (WC 08009)

 

HPE 141-143-Fitness & Conditioning: (9-12, Students wishing to repeat this course should have earned at least a “C” in the last semester of participation.) A course offered Fall, Winter and spring semesters. The focus is on increasing the student’s physical conditioning level and to develop positive habits for lifelong fitness activities including will be an emphasis on exercise, nutrition, and decisions for a healthy living lifestyle. HPE 141-Fall, 142-Winter, 143-Spring. (WC 08005)

 

HPE 500-Sport Participation Fitness: (9-12) Students successfully completing a ZHS sport season may earn a .5 credit.   For this credit to count for the 1.5 Health and Fitness graduation requirement students must also compete a health-fitness assessment administered by the HPE Department.  If the assessment is not taken or not passed the credit can be used as a General Elective through HPE 501.

 

HPE 501-Sport Elective: (9-12) Students successfully completing a ZHS sport season may earn a .5 credit. The credit can be used as a General Elective rather than a HPE credit.

 

 

MTH 130-131-Algebra I: (9) Algebra I is a two-semester course. This is a college prep math course. (WC 02052)

MTH 130-A: Students are introduced initially to the language of Algebra followed by the addition, subtraction, multiplication and division of real numbers; polynomials and their factoring and application in fractions. The student will also solve linear equations in one variable.

MTH 131-B: This semester the course will cover solving and graphing linear equations, solving and graphing equations in two variables, solving and graphing linear inequalities, factoring, and explore quadratic equations.

 

MTH 140-141-Algebra II: (10 -12, Prerequisites: Algebra I and Geometry) This two-semester course is a more in-depth study of the topics covered in Algebra I. This is a college prep math course. (WC 02056)

MTH 140-A: This semester the course covers inequalities, functions, systems of equations, an introduction to matrices, and polynomials. 

MTH 141-B:  This semester the course is an extension of Algebra IIA.  It covers radicals, irrational numbers, quadratic equations, an introduction to conic shapes, and polynomial functions.

 

MTH 150-151-Geometry: (9-10, Prerequisite: completion of Algebra I) In this two-semester course the relationships between geometric figures are investigated. The student will use the compass, protractor and straightedge to make constructions from which conclusions are reached by inductive reasoning. This is a college prep math course. (WC 02072)

MTH 150-A: For the first semester, students are introduced to the foundations of Geometry.  Topics covered include relationships of points, lines, planes, and angles; perpendicular and parallel lines; congruent triangles; quadrilaterals; and proportion and similarity.

MTH 151-B: For the second semester, students continue investigating concepts of Geometry.  The topics covered are right triangles and trigonometry; circles; polygons and area; surface area and volume; coordinate geometry; and Loci and Coordinate Transformations.

 

MTH 160-161-Pre-Calculus: (11-12, Prerequisite: completion of Algebra II) This two-semester course is designed to lay the groundwork for further study of mathematics at the college level. College credits may be earned through Central Washington University’s Cornerstone Program in MATH 153 and/or MATH 154 for those students who qualify.  See instructor for details. (WC 02110)

MTH 160-A: The topics covered in this semester will include function operations, systems of equations, graphing, and the foundation for trigonometry.  There will be an emphasis on graphing techniques.

MTH 161-B:  This semester will include an in depth look at trigonometry and its applications, the conic sections and their formulas and logarithmic and exponential function.  Introductory calculus topics may be offered as enrichment.

 

MTH 170-171-Calculus: (12 Prerequisite: completion of Pre-Calculus and teacher recommendation.)  A two-semester course of advanced college level math allows students to expand their mathematical concepts.  Students may opt to take the College Board AP exam in May and earn Advance Placement college credits for their work. College credits may be earned through Central Washington University’s Cornerstone Program in MATH 172 and/or MATH 173 for those students who qualify. See instructor for details. (WC 02121)

 

SCI 102-103-Integrated Science 9: (9) Integrated Science is a two-semester course and is the introductory course to the high school science curriculum.  This course is general science requirement and is a college preparatory course. (WC 03201)

SCI 102: Science A is the first semester of the Integrated Science series for all freshmen. It will focus on mapping, minerals, rocks, weathering, erosion, soils, and water. Specifically, it focuses on the scientific method to solve problems and to understand variables within experiments. The science disciplines of cartography and geology will be covered.

SCI 103:  Science B is the second semester of the Integrated Science series for all freshmen. The emphasis for this semester will be a general introduction to chemistry, physics, and astronomy. The students will study the laws of matter, potential and kinetic energy, design of the Periodic Table, chemical bonds and reactions, energy, and our solar system.

 

SCI 120-121: Biology: (10) This beginning biology course is two semesters in length.  The course is designed to be a general survey of basic biological concepts and as an introductory course into laboratory science.  Students completing Biology A will have the option of enrolling in Biology B.  Students who successfully complete this beginning Biology courses may later enroll in Advanced Biology courses.  This course meets Lab Science graduation requirements and is a college preparatory course. (WC 03051)

SCI 120: Biology A: This course in a beginning class in the biological sequence and must be taken before advancing in the sequence.  The emphasis in this course will be cellular biology and biochemistry.  Specific concepts covered include, but not limited to the science and method of biology, ecology, cells, cell chemistry, photosynthesis and respiration, and biological lab procedures. 

SCI 121: Biology B: (Prerequisite: Biology A) This is the second course in the biology sequence.  The emphasis in this course will be genetics and the kingdoms of simple organism.  Specific concepts covered include Mendelian genetics and applied genetic inheritance.

 

SCI 123: Anatomy & Physiology: (11-12 Offered in Odd Years 2023); Prerequisite: Completion of Biology A & B with at least a “B” grade or permission of instructor). Advanced Biology is highly recommended for all students planning on life science related majors in college.  This semester course offers an examination and in-depth study of the human biology including the genetics, structure and function of human body.  Principle systems of the human body to be studied include skeletal, muscular, integumentary, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive. This course is a Lab Science elective for graduation and is a college preparatory course. (WC 03053)

 

SCI 127-128: Human Body Systems: (9-12 Offered Odd Years 2023) This is the second class in the Project Lead the Way Biomedical Science sequence that allows students to examine the structures and interactions of human body systems and explore the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease, all while working collaboratively to understand and design solutions to the most pressing health challenges of today and the future. Students examine the interactions of human body systems as they explore identity, power, movement, protection, and homeostasis. Exploring science in action, students build organs and tissues on a skeletal Manikin®; use data acquisition software to monitor body functions such as muscle movement, reflex and voluntary action, and respiration; and take on the roles of biomedical professionals to solve real-world medical cases.  This course is a Lab Science elective for graduation and is a college preparatory course. (WC 03203)

SCI 127-A: This course is the beginning semester of Human Body Systems.  Successful completion allows the student to continue on in Human Body Systems studies.

SCI 128-B: (Prerequisite: SCI 127) This is the second course in the Biomedical Science program.

 

SCI 125-126: Principles of Biomedical Science: (9-12 Offered Even Years 2024) This is a two-semester course and is the introductory course of the Project Lead the Way Biomedical Science program. Students explore concepts of biology and medicine to determine factors that led to the death of a fictional person. While investigating the case, students examine autopsy reports, investigate medical history, and explore medical treatments that might have prolonged the person’s life. The activities and projects introduce students to human physiology, basic biology, medicine, and research processes while allowing them to design their own experiments to solve problems. This class is a science elective lab-based class. This course is a Lab Science elective for graduation and is a college preparatory course. (WC 03203)

SCI 125-A: This course is the beginning semester of Biomedical Science.  Successful completion allows the student to continue on in Bio-Med studies.

SCI 126-B: (Prerequisite: SCI 125) This is the second course in the Biomedical Science program.

 

SCI 140-141: Chemistry: (11-12) (Prerequisite: two semesters of Algebra II with at least a B grade or teacher recommendation.) Chemistry is a two-semester course. The major portion of the time is devoted to the classroom with the remaining utilizing the laboratory exploration to supplement classroom concepts. Practical applications of chemistry used in the home, the environment, and industry are emphasized. College bound students are encouraged to take Chemistry. This course is a Lab Science elective for graduation and is a college chemistry preparatory course. (WC 03101).

SCI 140: Chemistry A: The first semester will introduce classification of matter, its phases, and properties and classes. Additional topics covered will be atomic structure, electronic structure, periodic properties, nomenclature and formulas, chemical reactions, solution chemistry, and stoichiometric analysis. 

SCI 141: Chemistry B: The second semester will introduce gas laws, kinetic theory, thermochemistry, quantum theory, atomic structure, chemical bonding, molecular structure, acids/bases precipitation, and intermolecular forces.

 

SCI 163-Sport Psychology: (10-12) Sport Psychology is a class intended for athletes, but not limited to athletes, that focuses on the application of mental training to improve athletic performance or classroom performance. It is designed to provide practical application of techniques and tools a student and/or athlete may apply to increase their performance output in the classroom and the athletic arena. This is a one semester course offered for students/athletes that have a desire to improve their “mental game”.  During the semester, the student will learn about the science our nervous system, our sensory system, how we learn and memorize, and how emotion and motivation can play significant roles in our athletic performance. As well as learning the science behind sports psychology, you will also learn specific techniques that you can put into practice for your specific sport. Techniques such as mental imagery, sports routines, relaxation, the development of positive attitudes, team building, and the power of inspiration will be taught during this class. This course will count as a general science elective or can cross credit as a Social Studies elective. (WC 03202)

 

SCI 180-181-Physics: (12, Minimum requirement concurrent enrollment in Pre-Calculus, with completion of Pre-Calculus at a C or better recommended) Recommended for students interested in engineering careers, these two semesters are a college preparatory courses which provide a general survey of classical physics.  This course is a Lab Science elective for graduation. (WC 03151)

SCI 180-A: The first semester begins with velocity and extends to topics including acceleration, forces, vectors, and projectile motion.

SCI 181- B: The second semester will cover universal gravitation, momentum, energy, waves and energy transfer, light and nuclear physics.

 

 

 

SOC 100-Civics & Government: (9) This semester course is designed to acquaint the students with the basic operations of government and responsibilities of citizens.  Special emphasis is given to the origins of democracy, the creation of the great documents of the United States and the workings of the judicial and legislative system for both the State of Washington and the United States.  An overview of geography is also presented. (WC 04161)

 

SOC 110-111-United States History: (10) United States History is a two-semester course providing an overview of the history of the United States and satisfies the state requirement for graduation. (WC 04101)

SOC 110- A:   The first semester covers 19th Century America with emphasis on the American Civil War, American West and Industrialization.

SOC 111- B:  The second semester covers the World Wars, the Great Depression, and the beginning of the Cold War.

 

SOC 120-121-Contemporary World Problems-CWP: (12) This two-semester course is an investigation of contemporary world affairs and satisfies the state requirement for graduation. (WC 04064)

SOC 120-A:  The first semester covers History of the 20th Century. CWP-A spans modern history from the 1900’s to the current day.  Topics covered are: Causes World War II, the Holocaust, Korean War, the Cold War, the Nuclear Age, the Space Race, Watergate, Vietnam. The Political Parties, their platforms and how government functions are covered as well. Students will keep abreast of current world activities and how they are affected by them

SOC 121- B: The second semester emphasis will be on current trends, ideas, and issues.  Personal, medical, political, and moral ethics will be discussed, and an analysis made on how they have evolved in the late 20th century. Environmental and economic issues, terrorism, human and civil rights issues will be examined. World leaders and ongoing conflicts will be studied. National issues will be address, i.e., censorship, Title IX, and more.

 SOCIAL STUDIES COURSES:

SOC 130-The American Civil War: (9-12 Offered ODD graduation years 2023) A one semester course that will examine in depth this seminal event in United States history and one of the important events in history of the world.  The course will examine the causes of the American Civil War, its central personalities, and military, political and social events.  Course content will also examine the immediate aftermath of the war, the Reconstruction Era, and the lasting impact the American Civil War has had on the nation.  This class will count toward core graduation requirements. (WC 04109)

 

SOC 140-The Lewis and Clark Expedition: (9-12 Offered in EVEN graduation years 2024) A semester course examining one of the most important undertakings of our young nation.  Students will study in-depth the history leading up to, during and immediately following the expedition. Native American Indian interpretation of the events will also be analyzed in perspective.  Between May 14, 1804, and September 23, 1806, the Corps of Volunteers for Northwest Discovery, with Merewether Lewis and William Clark as co-captains, traveled more than 8,000 from the banks of the Mississippi River to the Pacific Ocean and back, documenting the character of the new Louisiana Purchase and its people.  President Thomas Jefferson's letter of instruction to Merewether Lewis stated clearly that a primary objective for the expedition was to discover a "practicable water-communication across the continent, for purposes of commerce."  As ambassadors, they engaged in diplomatic and commercial negotiations with members of the native cultures they encountered along the trail. This class will count toward core graduation requirements. (WC 04109)

 

SOC 150-History of Modern Warfare: (10 -12 Offered in ODD graduation years 2023) If there is one clear trend in human history, it is conflict.  That conflict has increased in scale, intensity and ferocity, culminating with the extraordinary dimensions of war in the 20th Century.  This course will cover the major 20th Century wars and will do from the present world conflicts and work back towards “The Great War”. Topics include Terrorist and guerilla warfare, Arab-Israeli-Middle East conflicts, Modern Europe conflict, Conflict in the Soviet States and Baltic conflicts (Bosnia), Somalia, Persian Gulf-Dessert Storm, Just Cause-Panama action, Grenada, Viet Nam, Korean War, World War II, and the aftermath of World War I. It will also examine the tactical, strategic, and technological innovations, which changed the face of warfare in the air, on land, and at sea, and it will help the student understand how and why wars have altered our world.  An overview will include the major trends in Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas since 1900, the social and political revolutions of our time, fascism and communism, and the examination of the causes, course, and consequences of the First and Second World Wars, stressing comparison of the two conflicts.   Students will be asked to consider a variety of historical analyses of wars and to study the process of interpretation as well as events. The course will make extensive use of video documentaries when available. This class will count toward core graduation requirements. (WC 04053)

 

SOC 160-World War II History: (10 -12 Offered in EVEN graduation years 2024) This course is an in-depth look at the causes of World War II.   Topics of consideration will include:  The Versailles Treaty, The Rise of Fascism and Nazi Germany, The Creation of Imperial Japan, the course of and events of WW II, the personalities of WW II, military tactics, strategy and weaponry of World War II, and passage into the Nuclear Age and the onset of the Cold War. This class will count toward core graduation requirements. (WC 04053)

 

SOC 170-Psychology: (11-12; Recommended 3.0 GPA, Offered in ODD graduation years 2023) This semester course for college/university bound students is the scientific study of human behavior with the object of understanding why living beings behave as they do.  Topics may include human behavior, consciousness, brain and behavior, child growth and development, adolescence, Freud's theory of personality course, post-Freudian theory, how people learn, psychological testing, recognizing and helping the troubled personality, group behaviors, gender roles, sexism, exploring unknown worlds, searching for new ways to grow, strategies for coping. This is a college prep course which counts as a social studies elective for graduation.  May not be repeated. This class will count toward core graduation requirements. (WC 04254)

 

SOC 180-Old West History: (9-12) This one semester course is for students who would like to explore the actual history and legends of the old west through literature, film and through traditional methods of history study.  An emphasis will be placed on prominent western writers whose depiction of the American West has shaped the perceptions of the actual history and lifestyles of Westerners.  Additionally, the evolution of the characters portrayed throughout American literature and film which is part of the western mystic will be traced. This class will count toward core graduation requirements. (WC 04109)

 

SOC 190-Personal Finance/Life Planning: (11-12) A semester course that focuses on social and life skills such as: budgeting, taxes, savings and investment, time management, personal inventory, and insurance. Students will find ZHS Senior Portfolio Project requirements will be covered in great depth in this class.  This course counts as a social studies elective for graduation. It may not be repeated. This class will count toward core graduation requirements. (WC 04207)

 

SOC 200-Outdoor Experience-Public Lands & Resources: (9-12; Offered in EVEN graduation year 2024) Public Lands and Resources brings students into a contact with environmental issues and interests and well as encourages students to develop their personal interests in the outdoors and nature.  Students will learn the history of American public lands, the causes and impact of the greatest environmental disaster in U.S. History, The Dust Bowl, explore basic concepts of ecosystems and man’s interaction and impact on the natural world. Students also will have contact with people who work in the fields of resource protection and enhancement.  Through the course of this wide range of experiences, students will be encouraged to pursue their own outdoor interests to better enjoy the outdoors. This course counts as a social studies elective for graduation. It may not be repeated. This class will count toward core graduation requirements. (WC 04106)

 

SOC 210-Outdoor Experience-Resource Management & Sustainability: (9-12; Offered in ODD graduation year 2023) Resource Management and Sustainability is an in depth look at resource use, energy, sustainability and the functions of ecosystems.    Students will further explore outdoor living and lifestyles, sustainable development, fisheries, geology, while continuing to develop and pursue their personal outdoor interests.  Another focus will be to identify and develop their ‘natural’ intelligence and understand how that can impact their learning and creativity.  Continued emphasis will be placed on getting students in contact with people who work in the fields of resource protection and enhancement and to be exposed to careers in the outdoors. This course counts as a social studies elective for graduation. It may not be repeated. This class will count toward core graduation requirements. (WC 04106)

 

 

 

Special programs classes are offered to help students with special needs in grades 9-12.  The course will be assigned upon testing, IEP qualification, ELL qualifications, need, and recommendations of special program instructors and/or administrators. The process must comply with both state and federal regulations.  Courses are offered Fall, Winter and Spring semesters, may be repeated and may substitute for standard graduation requirements based on MDT/IEP recommendations and requirements.

 

SPP 110-Transition to Work:  Transition services are available to help students that have been identified via IEP, plan for the move from school to work. (WC 22998)

 

SPP 130-ELL Skill Development-1: non-English speaking students will receive fundamental English instruction. This introductory class will focus on reading and writing in English.  Grammar and pronunciation will also be taught through English immersion lessons.  Conversation skills practices assist in language development. May be repeated with instructor permission.  Students qualify for this class based on ELPA21 scores. (WC 51008)

 

SPP 131- ELL Skill Development-2: English language learners will develop proficiency in English.  Lessons are interactive and individualized to maximize learning. Support of core classes is also provided.  May be repeated with instructor permission. Students qualify for this class based on ELPA21 scores (WC 51008)

 

SPP 140-143-Language Arts Skill Development: Qualified students will develop Language Arts skills in reading and/or writing based on their IEP.  The student will repeat the class every semester, unless exited out of Language Arts services, or by special arrangement agreed upon by an individual student’s IEP team. (WC 01999)

 

SPP 151-153-Mathematics Skill Development: Qualified students will develop Math skills based on their IEP.  The student will repeat the class every semester, unless exited out of Math services, or by special arrangement agreed upon by an individual student’s IEP team WC 02999)

 

 

SPAN 100-101-Spanish I-Introductory: (10-12) This two-semester course which introduces the language and culture of the Spanish speaking world. Possible college credit offered through CWU College in the High School program. (WC 06101)

SPA 100-A:  The student will learn to communicate effectively in basic situations such as telling the time, talking about the weather, expressing likes and dislikes, giving and asking for information, talking about actions, etc. Although emphasis will be placed on providing as much comprehensible Spanish language input as possible in class, the other communicative skills (speaking, writing and reading) will be initiated simultaneously and placed within a cultural context.  

SPA 101-B:  This semester provides a continuation of introductory Spanish.  Students will continue to develop communicative effectiveness in increasingly more complicated linguistic and cultural situations: going shopping, talking about professional goals, comparing people and things, talking about past events, etc. Students will learn how to prepare individual or group oral presentations.  They will hear a large amount of input in the Spanish language and will begin to work up a portfolio of their best written compositions in Spanish. Possible college credit offered through CWU College in the High School program.

 

SPA 200-201-Spanish II-Intermediate: (10 -12, Prerequisite: Spanish I-A & B with a grade of at least a C or instructor permission).  In Spanish II, students begin with an in-depth practice review of the language acquired in Spanish I and then go on to practice communicative skills in new and increasingly more challenging cultural and linguistic situations: talking about a trip or something that happened, talking about childhood, and discussing school issues. In Spanish II, special emphasis will be placed on learning about the various Spanish-speaking countries. Possible college credit offered through CWU College in the High School program. (WC 06102)

SPA 200- A: In this semester portfolios of high-quality work in the Spanish language will be expanded and students will prepare an oral presentation on the subject of their choice.  The students will learn to talk about school activities, shopping, what they did over weekends and holidays and to also be able to write letters in Spanish.

SPA 201-B: In this semester students will learn to communicate their emotions, give advice and express their opinions on current issues, talk about field trips, organize events and apply for a job in Spanish. More and more emphasis will be put on the written skills (reading and writing) and portfolios and oral presentations will be continued as well as the study of specific cultural elements of the Spanish-speaking countries.